St. George for England – Added Verses

Le Sieur de Bayard held a bridge and never once did shirk.
Don John of Austria, he thumped and thrashed the Turk.
St. Michael and St. Catherine appeared to Joan of Arc.
Scanderbeg and Sobieski always hit their mark.
Ferdinand and Isabella took Alhambra Hall,
But Saint George, Saint George, he made the dragon fall!
Saint George he was for England; Saint Denis was for France,
Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

There is a ballad in Percy’s Reliques of Ancient English Poetry, first printed in 1612, which lists great knights and heroes of old and compares them to Saint George. You can read it here. I wrote this extra verse myself, and am posting it here in honor of Saint George’s Day.
As for the heroes listed, le Sieur de Bayard was a French knight in the 1500’s, who was known as the “Good Knight without Fear and without Reproach”. (He has no connection to Bayard, the steed of Rinaldo). You can read some of his adventures in The Red True Story Book by Andrew Lang. Don Juan of Austria led the Christian fleets against the Turkish fleet at the Battle of Lepanto on October 7, 1591, which saved Christendom from Islam (temporarily, at least). You can read a magnificent ballad about the fight (better by far than anything I’ll ever write) by G. K. Chesterton, here. Joan of Arc is universally known, but many people have misconceptions about her. A good and accurate summary of her life can be found in Lang’s Red True Story Book. Skanderbeg, born George Castriot, heroically defended Albania and Christendom against the encroaching Turks from 1443 to his death in 1468. Longfellow’s poem Scanderbeg is about that hero’s defection from the Turks (he had been born Christian but raised as a Janissary) to rejoin the true Faith. King John III Sobieski of Poland rescued Vienna from the Turks who were besieging it in 1683, thereby breaking the power of the Ottoman Empire and putting Islam on the defensive for the next three hundred years. He arrived to save the day on September 11th, (probably not a coincidence), and actually raised the siege on the 12th, a feat commemorated in the Feast of the Holy Name of Mary. Ferdinand and Isabella, king and queen of Spain, completed the reconquest of that country from the Moors in 1492, when they conquered Granada from King Boabdil, a feat which gave Spain the unity and security she needed to bring the Catholic Faith to the New World. Lord Byron’s “Ballad on the Siege and Conquest of Alhama” is not about the final loss, but about an earlier one. Some ballads on Boabdil have been Englished, however, by John Lockhart and by James Gibson, and may be found in their Ancient Spanish Ballads, and The Cid Ballads and other Poems, respectively.
As for Saint George himself, he was martyred under Emperor Diocletian in Diospolis, in Palestine [now called Lod in Israel]. The legend of the dragon was not attached to him until the time of the First Crusade, when his popularity in the west exploded – but that is a story for another post. For now, I refer you to the summary in the Catholic Encyclopedia.

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Shameless Plug: Aucassin and Nicolette

My latest Kelmscott-style reprint from Rossignol Books is now available! Aucassin and Nicolette, as translated by Andrew Lang. Aucassin and Nicolette is from Old French, where it was written sometime in the 1100’s or 1200’s. No one knows who wrote it, or for whom, but it is one of the most, if not the most, beautiful story in all of medieval literature. It was written in alternating prose and poetry, and tells the story of Aucassin, son of Count Garin of Beaucaire, and Nicolette, a slave girl bought from Carthage, whose families try to drive them apart. Mingled with this story are some of the most realistic glimpses of peasant life we have, a trip to the strange land of Torelore, warfare, pirates, and more. Will true love triumph? Will Aucassin stop moping and become a great knight? Will Nicolette ever be reunited with her birth family? Why is the King of Torelore tending his baby while his wife leads his army? Find out the answers to these and more questions, in Aucassin and Nicolette.

The Rossignol Books edition includes the original music for the poetry, and fifteen illustrations from a classic Romantic-era edition. For a mere US$7.50, plus shipping and handling, this beautiful reprint of a beautiful story can be yours!

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The Romance of Morien

My latest Kelmscott-style reprint from Rossignol Books is now available! The Romance of Morien, as translated by Jessie Weston. Morien is from Middle Dutch, written in verse around the 1200’s, as part of the massive Lancelot Compilation, a sprawling four-volume work which as it stands includes nine complete romances and the end of a tenth, and possibly used to have more in the now-lost first volume. Most of these are translations into Dutch from French, but some of them have no known source, and one of these is Morien. Chronologically, this romance is set between the end of the Prose Lancelot, and the beginning of the Quest for the Holy Grail. No one knows who wrote it, or when, or in what language it was originally. The prologue states that some versions exist in which Percival was Morien’s father, but no such versions survive.

Sir Aglovale, brother of Sir Perceval of Galles, fell in love with a Moorish woman beyond the sea, and left her, promising to return. He never kept his promise, and now his son, Sir Morien, has come to England in search of his father. Can Sir Gawain help the family reunite? Can Sir Lancelot slay a ferocious beast? Will the Saxons overrun the realm of Logris? Is Agloval Morien’s real father, or is it Perceval? Find out the answers to all of these in The Romance of Morien! For the light Morien sheds on the legend of the Holy Grail, and for its merits as a story in its own right, this romance is an excellent addition to the shelf of any lover of chivalry. For a mere US$7.50, plus shipping and handling, this beautiful reprint of a beautiful story can be yours!

Rossignol Books